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Future Now: You Can Get A 3D Printed Robot Eye


Ever considered what life could be like if you there were robotic enhancements available for your body? Fascinated with the idea of being part cyborg or machine? The possibility of that becoming a reality is closer than you might think. Researchers have managed to utilize 3D printing technology to engineer a functional bionic eye.

Pushing The Limits Of 3D Printing

Thanks to continuing developments in 3D printing technology, creating bionic eyes to restore sight shows promise. The technology is still in its early stages of development. But, the University of Minnesota has successfully used 3D printing to create a synthetic eye that can detect light.

Google

Through a complex process, a bionic eye containing photodetectors is created within the span of an hour. Photosensors are useful for human-made eyes. They can be adjusted for a custom fit and are sensitive to capturing light and visuals.

Humans And Technology Meld As One

Humans may not be able to outfit their body with 3D printed appendages and organs just yet, but the potential is there. Problems with the eye, such as age-related macular degeneration are propelling the development of working technological solutions via 3D printing.

Google

Instead of reliance on eye donation banks and transplants to save one’s vision, patients who need to replace an eye or a retina may one day be able to have it printed on demand. However, researchers are still in the most primitive stages of experimenting with bionic eyes and limited functioning.

Future Options To Restore Sight

Advancements in medicine and technology have come a long way. In 2015, octagenarian Ray Flynn made history, upon receiving a working retinal implant. Flynn had been suffering from age-related macular degeneration, which caused many mundane tasks to be a struggle. Medical technology helped return the gift of sight.

Google

For years, people with degenerative eye conditions have had to learn to live with vision impairment in varying degrees. As progression in 3D printing pushes the envelope of what’s possible, access to highly functional implants and prosthetics may soon be the new normal.

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