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Thanks To An Incredible Community, These Hospitalized Kids End Their Day With A Magical View


When you’re a child bound to a hospital bed, it can seem impossible to enjoy life. However, being provided a bit of joy during the day can make all the difference. That’s exactly what this sweet community decided to do for its local children’s hospital!

What Started As A Goodbye…

Steven Brosnihan has spent the last eight years completely transforming the lives of sick children in Providence, Rhode Island. However, the hero isn’t a doctor– he’s a cartoon artist. He first began to volunteer at the Hasbro Children’s Hospital in Providence back in 2010, when he made a simple yet life-altering discovery.

Alex Gagne

When cheering up the patients, he noticed something mundane yet relevant: the fact that his bus stop could be seen from several of the hospital windows. He told the kids he was visiting that if they looked out their windows at 8:30 p.m. (when he left work), he would flash his bicycle lights at them to say goodnight. At the time, Brosnihan didn’t think much of it – but it soon altered the schedule of the entire community!

Something Close To Magic

After realizing how delighted the patients were at his kind gesture, Brosnihan decided to try to get more people involved in the nightly ritual. The hospital sat across a river that was opposite a number of Providence’s local businesses. So, Brosnihan decided to reach out to them and invite them to join in his tradition.

Richard W. Dionne, Jr.

At first, he only collected a handful of businesses who were willing to flash their lights along with him. However, as word of his heartwarming mission spread, more groups joined in to support the kids in the hospital across the river. Soon, bars, libraries, restaurants, and even police cruisers got involved – and the patients were overwhelmed with delight!

A Blinding, Breathtaking Sight

Now, at 8:30 p.m. every night, a “minute of magic” ensues for the patients of Hasbro. Twinkling lights fill the skyline for the sick children in an effort to bring them a spark of happiness before they go to sleep. And for the kids witnessing the touching ritual, it can illuminate their incredible worth.

AP Photo

Brosnihan says that the magical gesture–now known as Good Night Lights–seems to help the sick kids feel special. Those who witness it for the first time experience gleeful surprise! Though the community asks for nothing in return for the sweet ritual, the patients of the hospital make sure to thank them every night… by flashing their own lights back.

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