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Animals Have Started Sleeping Through The Day to Avoid Humans

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Can you believe that animals in the wild are becoming nocturnal to stay away from humans? Surprisingly, research conducted by the WWF and other organizations has found that our furry friends are actually staying up at night to prevent interactions with people. The reason why animals have started sleeping through the day to avoid humans is so crazy, you’ll have to read to believe.

Night Moves

Everyone knows that human beings have had a pretty major environmental footprint on the planet. Not only have humans altered the Earth with land development and agriculture, but we’ve also practiced deforestation. According to  WWF’s Living Planet Report 2018, human beings have destroyed a whopping 60% of animals like mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish, in the last 50 years.

This has resulted in a huge loss of land for wildlife, developing in the mass extinction of some animals, and the endangerment of others. Interestingly enough, the precious wildlife that still thrives in the wild has definitely adapted to human presence. That’s why several species of animals have literally changed their daily habits. This includes changing their waking day-to-day activities to nighttime.

A New Trend

Shockingly, WWF’s research, the enormous amount of food and land used by humanity over the last 200,000 years has negatively impacted animals around the globe. In fact, WWF’s study shows that human beings have had a much larger effect on the planet than any other living creature. Sadly, the human footprint has resulted in the extinction of beloved animals like sea turtles, gorillas, tigers, and orangutans. As a result of our impact on the environment, hundreds of critters have completely changed their sleeping patterns to embrace nocturnal life.

Another study conducted by the University of California, Berkeley shows that animals have started to display a new trend: nocturnality. Believe it or not, the university’s research demonstrates that fun hobbies like camping and hiking are extremely disruptive to wildlife. About the study’s results, Berkeley ecologist Kaitlyn Gaynor revealed, “It suggests that animals might be playing it safe around people.” Gaynor continued, “We may think that we leave no trace when we’re just hiking in the woods, but our mere presence can have lasting consequences.” Yikes!

Change of Pace

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