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How Schools Are Solving Children’s Hunger And Food Waste In One Fell Swoop

You would be surprised at how much food is wasted on a daily basis in cafeterias across America. According to a report by the United States Department of Agriculture, approximately 30 to 40 percent of food is thrown out – a shocking statistic considering that millions of American children suffer from starvation.

However, schools across the country are taking matters into their own hands and have an incredibly clever solution to stopping childhood hunger.

Nothing Goes To Waste

With almost half of our food supply going straight into the trash, teachers came up with a smart invention: share tables.

This station encourages kids to place any leftover packaged food on the table. The teachers then donate this extra food to local food banks or churches. This is a way to help any children who go without food – and, shockingly, there are a lot of them.

Starving Kids Are In America, Too

While many commercials would lead you to believe starving children only exist in third-world countries, starvation is an epidemic among kids in America.

Many teachers say they often see their students go without food for the entire school day. Research supports their observations. According to No Kid Hungry, over 13 million children in the United States struggle with hunger.

A Simple Solution To A Massive Problem

This ingenious idea is not only easy to implement, but an excellent way to involve children in their communities. A crucial part of share tables is not just donating to food banks after school, but how kids are allowed to take food from the tables during lunch.

This means that the food items collected in schools are not simply sent off to an unknown charity – they are used to help local students fight off hunger. Share tables are a relatively new system in schools, but they are catching on. Hopefully, they will become staples in schools everywhere.

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