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Creative Dad Invents App That Makes Kids Respond to Parents

Raise your hand if you’ve ever asked your kid a question only to find him staring into his phone. All right, raise your hand if this happens 19 times a day. We know how obsessed teenagers can be with their devices. It’s especially frustrating if you can’t get in touch with them when there’s an emergency or you need to deliver an urgent message.

Don’t Keep Me Hanging

London dad Nick Herbert experienced similar frustration touching base with his son, Ben. “He may prioritize his friends’ messages over mine, sometimes,” he explained.

Enough was enough. So Herbert developed an app called ReplyASAP, which forces kids to suspend phone activities until they give their parental units a ring.

You Best Be Checking In, Son

The idea behind Reply ASAP is simple. It’s basically a hi-tech check-in. If the child receives a phone call from a parent, the phone will issue an alarm and freeze until he or she calls back. That means they could be missing out on fascinating group texts or games and nobody wants that. Considering how attached teenagers are to their phones, the strategy is very effective. You can hit snooze but the alarm will keep going.

Herbert’s son, Ben, admits, “It could be annoying – but on the flip side, it’s important.”

Resonating With Parents

So far, ReplyASAP is only available for Android phones. It’s currently free, but you can buy extra features for a little cash. Since the application launched in August of 2017, it’s been downloaded over 100,000 times. That means there are fewer teenagers blowing off their parents. (Probably managing it other ways, however.)

“From a safety perspective, if I send him a message it will tell me where he is at the time when the message arrives on his phone,” Herbert says. He says the invention has even brought them closer together. Kids, text your parents! They probably bought you that phone, anyway.

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